Everyday Pioneers... Emiko Studios interview

In the second instalment of our Everyday Pioneer series, we caught up with Coral, founder of the gorgeous sustainable children's clothing collection Emiko Studios. Handmade in Manchester by recycling waste into one-off pieces, Coral chats to us more about how the brand got started and why.

Don't forget, one lucky entrant in our Christmas Jumper Competition will win their very own handmade piece from Emiko Studios collection! Which item would you pick?

What made you want to launch a children’s clothing brand and how did you get started?

I actually started with womenswear but after having my daughter Emi I realised (especially in Hong Kong where she was born) the gap in the market for the type of clothing I wanted. Once I started making Emi clothes, I got so much more out of it. After moving back to the U.K. I made more and more pieces, testing them out on Emi – how they wear and fit – until a collection evolved organically and continues to grow.

Emiko Studios patchwork trousers

How far was the brand influenced by your own experience with fast fashion?

Witnessing the very ugly side of fast fashion when I worked in Bangladesh has influenced my attitude towards the industry. Everything in the Emiko collection is handmade in Manchester and, as the brand grows, we will move towards fair-trade factories and consciously choose organic and natural fibres.

Where does your inspiration come from?

Vintage work wear is the main inspiration. I’ve worked in vintage for a long time, it's where my passion lies. From the old smock dresses to the old chore worker jackets, there’s no trends or seasons, just staple pieces you can mix and match.

Emiko Studios painter trousers & patchwork trousers (left) and Ikat dress (right)

Do you have a favourite piece or idea?

I love the painter jacket and jeans combo, the idea stemmed from garments that were stained through everyday labour. And I just thought this is perfect for kids, because they get covered in stains and muck everyday, why not embrace that and make it cool!

Painter jacket and trousers co-ord


Fast fashion has driven the waste culture with clothing; when garments are dirt cheap it’s easier for us to throw them away. With the waste from left over cut offs of fabric, I make patchwork garments, like the Ikat patchwork trousers, made from 100% waste and a complete one-off.

What does Emiko do to encourage and support the circular economy?

Emiko garments are made to last and hand down when outgrown. Fast fashion has driven the waste culture with clothing; when garments are dirt cheap it’s easier for us to throw them away. With the waste from left over cut off’s of fabric, I make patchwork garments, like the Ikat patchwork trousers, made from 100% waste and a complete one-off. Emiko offers a recycling scheme where buyers can return their Emiko garments after use for a 30% discount on their next purchase. These garments, depending on the condition, I will recycle into new pieces or donate to organisations like dotte.

Coral at work!

From your own experience, how can children’s brands embrace sustainability more wholeheartedly in the future?

Being conscious of fabric choices; man-made fibres have a huge negative impact on our environment. Then there’s the labour costs, fast fashion brands bargaining the minimum price and subsequently contributing to poor working environments for vulnerable workers. Brands need to be encouraged to use their platforms to donate and recycle outgrown clothing, so it's not just going into our landfill. Make quality ethical garments that are built to last!

Emiko Studio Leopard smock.

Emiko Studios is handmade in Manchester, check out the full range on dotte here.

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